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mcdonnell: remaining in eu would be better than any brexit deal | politics

Shadow chancellor rejects claims of ‘civil war’ in Labour ranks over Brexit policyLabour conference 2019 - live updatesJohn McDonnell has said there is no future deal that could be better than Britain staying in the European Union as he rejected suggestions of a civil war Labour over the party’s Brexit position.Pledging to campaign to remain in the EU even if a future Labour government managed to bring a new deal back from Brussels and put it to a referendum, the shadow chancellor added that oth...

six ways to stay healthy when you're stressed | life and style

Keeping on top of your mental health in today’s taxing world can be tough. But a few changes can help lift the burdenHuman beings are not built to endure prolonged periods of stress. If you want to see an extreme example of what it can do to a person, observe prime ministers as they enter and exit Downing Street. Before, fresh-faced, they simper for the cameras. Afterwards, they are gaunt, grey and lined. It is like watching an accelerated version of ageing, and a reminder of how stress corrodes...

the trump-ukraine scandal is a taste of how dirty the us elections will get | richard wolffe | opinion

If you’re wondering what the next 14 months of the presidential election looks like, you are already looking at itAmerica has a grand tradition of the brazenly dumb criminal: the kind who is so desperately needy that he brags about his guilt.Back in the earliest days of the new media known as newspapers, a certain Chicago mob boss rose to fame by calling a press conference to proclaim everyone else’s guilt, if not exactly his innocence. Continue reading...

the giants were pilloried for picking daniel jones. guess what happened next... | sport

The Giants chose a quarterback with a middling reputation to succeed Eli Manning. The Duke product enjoyed a memorable debutDaniel Jones had a lot of doubters to prove wrong. When the New York Giants selected the Duke quarterback to be Eli Manning’s heir apparent with the sixth pick in this year’s draft, experts – actually pretty much everyone – accused them of reaching for someone who was not seen as a future NFL star during his college career. Even with Manning in decline, it was a controversi...

call for 1m people to join uk's biggest mass tree-planting campaign | environment

Woodland Trust urges volunteers to grab a spade and help tackle the climate crisisVolunteers are being urged to do their bit to stop the climate emergency by grabbing a spade and signing up for the biggest mass tree-planting campaign in the UK’s history.Plots in suitable sites around the country are being prepared for 30 November, when the Big Climate Fightback campaign will start with pledges sought from 1 million people. Local groups are being encouraged to run tree-planting events and council...

gambia's joy gives way to sinking distrust as barrow clings to power | global development

When he ended the brutal 22-year presidency of Yahya Jammeh, he was hailed as a hero. But the hope inspired by Adama Barrow’s ascent has long since fadedAlmost three years ago, Yahya Jammeh’s 22-year rule over the small west African nation of the Gambia came to a shock end. Fed up with the constant fear and human rights abuses, a floundering economy and endemic corruption, Gambians voted out one of Africa’s most notorious strongmen.The man who beat him, estate agent, businessman and one-time Arg...

scientists prepare to drill for million-year-old ice in antarctica | science

Researchers hope to use bubbles trapped in ice to help predict effect of CO2 on the Earth’s climateMillion-year-old ice buried deep in Antarctica could hold crucial information about the planet’s past and help climate predictions.And scientists with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) are a step closer to unearthing it. Continue reading...

rugby fans allowed own food in world cup venues after shortages | world news

Organisers lift stadium ban amid complaints of long queues and food quickly selling outAfter doomsday warnings over possible beer shortages during the Rugby World Cup in Japan, it is fans’ appetite for solid, rather than liquid refreshment, that has created the first minor headache for organisers.Just four days into the tournament, an unpopular ban on fans taking food into the 12 venues has been dropped after complaints about long queues and food quickly selling out inside the stadiums. Continue...

butch cassidy and the sundance kid at 50: their charm lives on | film

The 1969 western paired Paul Newman and Robert Redford to magical effect and remains one of the most undeniably entertaining westerns to date“The horse is dead.”It’s the middle of a tense scene in the 1969 smash Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The town sheriff is attempting to round up a posse to track down Butch and Sundance, leaders of the Hole-In-The-Wall Gang, which has been robbing banks and trains with such impunity that they’ve become an embarrassment for lawman across the frontier. U...

permanent record by edward snowden review – gripping spy story | books

The NSA whistleblower’s account of his life and actions against the US security services is a page-turnerThe work “hack” used to be a term of approbation among geeks, as a means of describing an elegant way of circumventing a difficulty that had defeated lesser minds. In the old days, a good hacker was someone constantly on the lookout for better ways of writing code and there’s a sense in which the young Edward Snowden was one of those. At high school, he resented the way homework absorbed valu...

can you solve it? maths on the back of an envelope | science

Stationery puzzles to get your brain movingToday, we’re pushing the envelope.1) A piece of paper is folded to make a shape that looks a bit like the back of an envelope, illustrated below. If the paper is unfolded again to make a flat sheet, what shape will it be? Prove it. Continue reading...

ancient turkish town of hasankeyf begins to disappear under water - in pictures | cities

The small town of Hasankeyf, in Turkey’s Kurdish-majority south-east, inhabited for 12,000 years, is doomed to disappear in the coming months. An artificial lake, part of the Ilısu hydroelectric dam project, will swallow it up. The huge dam, Turkey’s second largest, is being filled further down the Tigris River, despite protests that it will displace thousands of people and risks creating water shortages downstream, namely in Iraq. Residents are being moved from the ancient town to New Hasankeyf...

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