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On my radar: Carlos Acosta’s cultural highlights | Stage

The renowned ballet dancer on Zadie Smith, fun and afros in The Get Down and Wifredo Lam’s powerful paintingBorn in Havana, Cuba in 1973, Carlos Acosta joined the Royal Ballet in 1998. He was a principal guest artist from 2003 to 2016, when he left and founded the company Acosta Danza in Cuba. In 2007 his autobiography No Way Home became a bestseller; in 2014 he was awarded a CBE. Yuli, a biopic inspired by his story, is released on 12 April after a Royal Opera House event on 3 April that will b...

Brexit: Hammond denies plotting to oust May but admits deal may not pass | Politics

Chancellor says talk about unseating PM is ‘frankly self-indulgent at this time’Philip Hammond has admitted Theresa May’s Brexit deal may not be able to get through the Commons amid swirling speculation that the prime minister could be forced out within days.After reports that cabinet ministers were plotting to force May out and would seek to force her hand in Monday’s cabinet meeting, the chancellor told Sky News’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday that Conservatives colleagues were “very frustrated” and “...

Hunt for bogus asthma cure threatens pangolins | Environment

The most trafficked mammal on the planet is in dangerous declineOne of nature’s most remarkable creatures, the pangolin, is being driven to extinction as hunting and trafficking have soared in recent years. Studies have discovered that hundreds of thousands of these distinctive, scaly animals are now being killed every year to satisfy markets in Asia, making it the most trafficked and poached mammal on Earth.The pangolin is hunted for its meat – and also for its scales, which are believed to hav...

Beyoncé effect fills galleries with a new generation of art devotees | Culture

Fame sells: that’s the lesson in a survey revealing the world’s most popular exhibitions during a bumper yearIn Paris, it was Beyoncé and Jay-Z; in Washington, it was Barack and Michelle Obama; while, in London, visitors queued to look at Pablo Picasso’s erotic muse or Grayson Perry’s summer picks.Last year the lustre of celebrity, whether garnered from fashion and entertainment or history, seemed to be the best way to attract visitors to museums and galleries. Continue reading...

Sadiq Khan challenges Theresa May to act against Tory Islamophobia | Politics

London mayor tells prime minister: join Labour in adopting a new definition of hate crime against MuslimsThe mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has challenged the Conservatives to adopt a new definition of Islamophobia, saying that he has been repeatedly subjected to anti-Muslim abuse from Tory members and supporters.In a letter to Theresa May, Khan calls on the prime minister to order her party to deal with the issue. He says it must be among measures taken to reassure British Muslims about their saf...

Zak Brown: ‘McLaren may consider their F1 future without changes’ | Sport

Team’s chief executive believes that a meeting this week must deliver better competition if the sport is to flourishZak Brown has warned that McLaren, second only to Ferrari in terms of seasons on the grid, would consider quitting Formula One if the sport’s problems are not addressed this season.Twelve months ago in Bahrain, F1’s owner, Liberty Media, revealed its vision of how motor sport’s elite competition would look in 2021. On Tuesday Liberty meets the governing FIA and all 10 F1 teams in L...

Mauricio Pochettino finds cooked-up pressures a little hot to handle | Andrew Anthony | Football

The Tottenham manager is not the first to mishandle rumours of departure but the Argentinian has made a series of missteps since being linked with Manchester UnitedThere is a species of well-known quotes that fulfils such a useful function that it’s convenient to overlook whether or not they were actually said. Although there is no official record of it, Harold Macmillan is often cited as saying: “Events, dear boy, events,” apparently in response to a question about what blows governments off co...

Lizzie Kelly aims at Aintree with Tea For Two, her ‘horse of a lifetime’ | Sport

If Kelly wins the Grand National? ‘You probably wouldn’t see me for four days – I’d be drinking tequila in Liverpool somewhere’Something about the Grand National brings the child out in Lizzie Kelly for a few moments as she contemplates her first ride in the race on 6 April. Hugging a mug of tea in her family’s kitchen in north Devon, she says: “I was pretty obsessed with it at one point, read lots of books about it, knew lots of random facts, like having Red in the horse’s name has been quite l...

Universities to be fined for awarding too many top degrees | Education

Education secretary Damian Hinds to take tough measures on institutions found guilty of artificial grade inflationBritish universities must slash the number of top degrees they award or risk undermining their world-class reputation, the education secretary has warned.Damian Hinds said there had been a steep and unjustifiable rise in the awarding of first-class degrees, urging universities to “reset the norm” by handing out a higher proportion of 2:1s. Offending universities could face fines, or ...

Hamilton’s young star says Britain must confront its colonial past | Stage

Jamael Westman explains how his role in the West End show has affected his politics as well as his careerThe swift rise to fame of Jamael Westman, leading man in the London cast of the hit musical Hamilton, may not equal the extraordinary ascent of the “$10 founding father” he plays in the US show, but it runs close.Westman who was brought up in Croydon, south London, was not a fan of musical theatre before he landed the part. Now, just three years out of drama school, the 26-year-old, who is of...

‘Ian Curtis wanted to make extreme music, no half measures’ | Music

Forty years after Joy Division’s seminal debut album, Jon Savage’s oral history, extracted below, sheds new light on the band and the city that shaped them• Read a Q&A with Jon SavageBernard Sumner (Joy Division): I felt that even though we were expecting this music to come out of thin air, we never, any of us, were interested in the money it might make us. We just wanted to make something that was beautiful to listen to and stirred our emotions. We weren’t interested in a career or any of t...

The drugs don’t work: what happens after antibiotics? | Global

Antibiotic resistance is growing so fast that routine surgery could soon become impossible. But scientists are fighting back in the battle against infectionThe first antibiotic that didn’t work for Debbi Forsyth was trimethoprim. In March 2016, Forsyth, a genial primary care counsellor from Morpeth, Northumberland, contracted a urinary tract infection. UTIs are common: more than 150 million people worldwide contract one every year. So when Forsyth saw her GP, they prescribed the usual treatment:...

Edvard Munch: Scandi novelists on the master of misery and menace | Art and design

How is the great Norwegian artist seen back home? Ahead of a new British Museum show, Karl Ove Knausgaard and other Scandinavian novelists explain what Munch means to themEdvard Munch’s most famous creation is a bit of a scream: the funny little figure with its squishy bald head, hands to face as if edified by some particularly scandalous bit of gossip, and all against that glorious flame-red sky. Can Munch be entirely serious? The Scream is cherished across the world and only marginally less fa...

MPs must seize control of the Brexit calamity. Mrs May has already lost it | Andrew Rawnsley | Opinion

The EU has given Britain a breathing space. It is imperative that it is used to find an escape from this nightmareA symbolic casualty of Britain’s rolling, roiling Brexit debacle is the “commemorative” 50p coin bearing the date 29 March 2019, which the government had planned to release. It was one of their more idiotic ideas to put such an item in the nation’s pockets and purses when the country is so divided and its destiny is swirled with such a dense fog of uncertainty. The coin is now as red...

Once more Balmedie prepares to fight Trump on the beaches | Kevin McKenna | UK news

A record number of locals objected to the US president’s development near his Aberdeenshire golf course – to no avail. But the struggle goes onThe word “douce” sits easily alongside a place like Balmedie, but would never be seen within a million miles of Donald Trump or any of his enterprises. Yet this pleasant coastal village a few miles north of Aberdeen is at risk of forever being associated with America’s pantomime president and the locals are aghast at the prospect.Last week planning offici...

Woman behind Brexit petition to revoke article 50 receives death threats | Politics

Online petition attracts more than 4m signatures as Margaret Georgiadou is forced to close Facebook accountFollow live updates on the People’s Vote marchThe woman behind the petition to revoke article 50 has said she is scared and has been forced to close her Facebook account after receiving multiple death threats for launching the challenge to Brexit.Margaret Georgiadou, who described herself as a frustrated remainer, set up the online petition in late February, calling for the UK government to...

Save Big on Corsair Gaming Headsets and a Mechanical Keyboard

From March 24 to 30, you can pick up one of two models of the great Corsair's Void Pro gaming headset on a sweet discount. One of Corsair's best mechanical keyboards is also on sale this week -- at a steep discount. The post Save big on Corsair gaming headsets and a premium keyboard appeared first on Digital Trends.

Christchurch shows how social media sites help spread the poison of far-right ideology | John Naughton | Opinion

The atrocity in New Zealand was carried out by a man fully aware of the power of the internetThe aftermath of the Christchurch atrocity brought significant media coverage of the attempts made by the tech companies, especially Facebook and YouTube, to take down the alleged killer’s video livestream and his so-called manifesto. These narratives had two subtexts. The first was to impress us with the sheer scale of the task. The second was implicitly to convey the public-spirited dedication of the e...

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