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  • Pete Buttigieg is the Democrats' flavour of the month. Just don't ask what he stands for | Nathan Robinson | Opinion

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See the news Pete Buttigieg is the Democrats' flavour of the month. Just don't ask what he stands for | Nathan Robinson | Opinion from Source New York Times on 16/04/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.

Pete Buttigieg is the Democrats' flavour of the month. Just don't ask what he stands for | Nathan Robinson | Opinion

For being the mayor of the 4th-largest city in Indiana, Pete Buttigieg has been shockingly successful in carving out a national political profile. Buttigieg has only just formally announced that he is running for president, but already he is placing near the top of some polls, and being given cover stories in national magazines, touted as a “wonder boy” and the “Democrats’ heartland hope.” But for all the buzz, an important question still hangs over Buttigieg: what, exactly does he stand for?Himself, mostly. The New York Times says Buttigieg puts “storytelling first, policy details later.” Media coverage of Buttigieg dwells on what his favorite socks are or his dogs’ personalities. Pete is all about Pete: Buttigieg is frequently evasive about his actual substantive agenda, preferring rhetoric about “freedom,” “democracy,” and “security.” His campaign’s branding and graphic design have been hailed as “radical.” As for his actual policies … he’s working on them.Buttigieg represents the apex of a kind of “politics of demographics.” Why is the mayor of a small city suddenly on the national political radar? It’s not as if Buttigieg’s tenure in office has been especially noteworthy—his signature policies were technocratic improvements like improving sewer technology along with some fairly middle-of-the road, even conservative, development initiatives. Buttigieg is not attracting attention for anything he has done, but for who he is. He’s a man who checks all the right boxes.In fact, that’s even how he pitches himself. Asked what sets him apart as a candidate, Buttigieg says:“You have a handful of candidates from the middle of the country, but very few of them are young. You have a handful of young candidates, but very few of them are executives. We have a handful of executives but none of them are veterans, and so it’s a question of: what alignment of attributes do you want to have?”In every profile of Buttigieg, you’ll inevitably hear the following facts: he went to Harvard, he was a Rhodes Scholar, he served in Afghanistan, he became a mayor before he was 30, he’s gay, and he speaks half a dozen languages. These, along with some impressively well-constructed stump speech rhetoric, are Pete’s sole claims to deserving the presidency. As he puts it, he has the right “alignment of attributes.”But politics shouldn’t be about people’s attributes, it should be about their values and actions. Pete Buttigieg is a...

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See the news Pete Buttigieg is the Democrats' flavour of the month. Just don't ask what he stands for | Nathan Robinson | Opinion from Source New York Times on 16/04/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.