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  • Slum golf: the sport that stormed the streets of Mumbai | Cities

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See the news Slum golf: the sport that stormed the streets of Mumbai | Cities from Source Digital Trends on 11/02/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.

Slum golf: the sport that stormed the streets of Mumbai | Cities

Anil Bajrang Mane grew up in a slum in Chembur, a suburb of Mumbai. His home – a single 10ft x 10ftroom – was right over the wall from the 10th hole of the members-only Bombay Presidency Golf Club, which sprawls across 100 acres of land: prime real estate in a city where the average population density is 31,700 people per sq km.When Mane was just 14, he dropped out of school to become a caddie on the other side of the wall. But it wasn’t until three years later, when he was 17, that he took his first swing, when a club member handed him a 7 iron and told him to have a go. The 150-yard shot changed his life, he says: he realised golf was his shot at fame and glory, the chance of a better life.There was only one problem: the club didn’t allow caddies to play on the course, insisting it would detract from its “exclusivity”. Mane earned his livelihood in a world that wouldn’t allow him to participate. Every night, he would cross back from the verdant, genteel club into his own world of single-room tenements, corrugated tin rooftops and poverty.“My mother’s health was frail and my father had suffered burns when a kerosene stove burst in our kitchen,” he says. “I had no option but to give up school and take up work.”FacebookTwitterPinterest Slum golf is exactly what it sounds like: golf played in the narrow streets and alleyways of an informal community. Photograph: Ritesh Uttamchandani But that didn’t hurt his love for golf. So he and his friends perfected a different game, one they unironically call “slum golf”.Slum golf is exactly what it sounds like: golf played in the narrow streets and alleyways of their informal community. The golfers sometimes dodge the street’s anatomy, but mostly they take advantage of it. Their “teeing ground”, “fairway” and “hazards” include houses, walls, drains, construction debris, parked vehicles, sleeping dogs, garbage dumps, stray cows and potholes. They play with cheap plastic ping pong balls and clubs made from construction rebar, fitted with hosepipe for grips.When Mane and his friends play, they wager 50 rupees (£0.54) a head. Winner takes the spoils.The first hole is outside Mane’s friend Suresh Ramesh Mehboobani’s doorstep. Like Mane, Mehboobani was a caddie while living in the Sindhi Camp slum, this onoriginally a refugee settlement that borders the golf course.FacebookTwitterPinterest Slum golfers sometimes dodge the street’s anatomy, but mostly they take advantage of it. Photograph: Ritesh Uttamchandani “Slum golf is what we do for fun,” Mehboobani says. “It started out as a way to have a go at the game when the club rules didn’t allow caddies to play on the course.”Although the club has since slightly relaxed its rules – it now allows caddies to use the club on Mondays, when it is closed to members – Mehboobani says they still play slum golf “for the fun of it, especially during the monsoon months, when the rains play havoc in Mumbai”.So when the German golfer Norman Dick stumbled upon a YouTube video of Mane and his friends teeing off from a...

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See the news Slum golf: the sport that stormed the streets of Mumbai | Cities from Source Digital Trends on 11/02/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.