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See the news micheal ward: ‘everywhere i go it’s good vibes’ | television & radio from Source Digital Trends on 17/11/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.

micheal ward: ‘everywhere i go it’s good vibes’ | television & radio

A few hours before I’m due to meet Micheal Ward, I get a text from his publicist. The photoshoot for this interview has finished more than an hour early – could I come a bit sooner? I race to a café in Blackheath, plush south London. When I arrive, Ward has already finished lunch. These shoots normally overrun, I say. How come this one was over so quickly? “I tried to warn them I was a model,” he smirks. “I know what I’m doing.”He certainly seems to. A year ago, Ward was entirely unknown as an actor. He was working for the e-commerce sites of brands like JD Sports, modelling athleisure. (Apparently there’s still a picture of him somewhere, deep in the bowels of the JD sports website.) Now 21, he’s bagged leading roles in two of the most high-profile portrayals of British gang life in years. In the first, Netflix’s revival of Top Boy, he plays Jamie, an east London boy climbing the rungs of a Hackney drug-dealing gang while simultaneously looking after his two young brothers. And there’s the upcoming feature film Blue Story, based on the spoken word performer Rapman’s wildly popular YouTube series about south London gang violence, in which Ward plays the brother of a gang member who gets dragged into a postcode war.FacebookTwitterPinterest Word on the street: trailer for Blue Story starring Micheal Ward Ward is beaming about it all. He has the energy of someone who can’t quite believe what’s happening. He’s just returned from the BET Awards, in Atlanta, and he says he’s never been in a room with so many celebrities: Lil’ Kim, the rising rap star DaBaby. His excitement is infectious. When I ask him if he’s enjoying himself he bursts into laughter.“The last two years have been the best two years of my life,” he says. “When you get a chance to travel, it’s a big blessing. Then actually doing it for work? And it’s free? I’m enjoying it, boy. Everywhere I go it’s good vibes.”I come from that world. I’ve seen the stuff that happens around meWard talks like the characters he plays on screen. His sentences are peppered with east London idioms and tend to begin with a “yeah man” and finish with a “you know what I’m saying?” He makes scripts full of London slang feel real and genuine, overcoming a common pitfall of lesser British dramas that try too hard with the grittiness. Now, when he reads something in a script that feels forced, he’ll speak up, offer his opinion. “That’s something I’ve got better at,” he says. “I’ve started to say no. No one says ‘bruv’ and ‘fam’ in every sentence. It doesn’t make sense.”Ward hopes Blue Story will become a timeless street movie in the vein of Boyz n the Hood, the 90s teen drama. Unlike Top Boy, which is fictional, Blue Story is drawn from real life; a number of former gang members consulted on the script and were present on set, confirming the accuracy of the actors’ portrayals. It tells the truth about south London violence, Ward says. “I come from that world. I’m not saying I’ve been involved in it, but I’ve seen stuff that happens in Top Boy and Blue Story around me.”FacebookTwitterPinterest ‘We come from Jamaica, literally from the mud’: Ward wears floral shirt by representclo.com; trousers by numeroventuno.com; gold chain by sergedenimes.com; and earring Micheal’s own. Photograph: David Titlow/The Observer Ward was born in Jamaica, but he grew up in Romford, Essex, where every now and then he would watch a seemingly innocuous event escalate to dangerous levels. “I’ve seen fights happen over something so small it could have been left behind, but that’s been brought back up, because of some personal vendetta.”Ward has never lived anything other than a law-abiding life, he says. In our conversation, he speaks of his character’s struggles, but none of his own. (I try to probe, but apart from being an Arsenal fan, which can be tough – “Arsenal bring some serious dark times to your life” – he seems entirely carefree.) But he has a sense of how easy it is to fall into crime. “People come up to me all the time, asking, ‘Wot, you got any white?’ even though I don’t sell. Imagine: I’m walking up the road and 10 people ask me that and I start to do the maths. I don’t know how much this stuff costs, but you think: you make £10 or less an hour working a job, when you could have just made that much in two footsteps. For me, the risk was never worth it. But for some people…”FacebookTwitterPinterest ‘Some artists from Jamaica have been hitting me up’: in Blue Story. Photograph: Nick Wall Ward recognises he has become an unlikely spokesperson for a section of society you rarely hear from. “I’m representing the hood,” he says, “even though I’m not from the hood. But it feels good at the same time. You feel like you’re something bigger than yourself. Because there are really people living this life and you’re showing that and you want...

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See the news micheal ward: ‘everywhere i go it’s good vibes’ | television & radio from Source Digital Trends on 17/11/2019 has been updated to day with the theme on feedixo.

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